Monday, July 13, 2009

New Oregon legislation.





There are a couple of new developments on the horizon here in Oregon. I thought they might be of interest to you. As motorcycle safety professionals they certainly hold some implications for our instructors.

Here's the first one.

Senate Bill 124B was signed into law June 24, 2009 by Governor Kulongoski. This act amends 807.010 to strengthen the penalty for riding unendorsed from a Class B traffic violation ($360) to a Class A traffic violation ($720), with provisions for waiving the fine with completion of a rider training course. The law goes into effect January 1, 2010.
The summary of changes follow:



(4) Except as provided in subsection (5) of this section, the offense described in subsection


(1) of this section, [vehicle] operating a vehicle without driving privileges, is a Class B traffic violation.


(5) The offense described in subsection (1) of this section, operating a vehicle without
driving privileges, that results from a person operating a motorcycle without a motorcycle
endorsement, is a Class A traffic violation.



(6)(a) The court shall suspend a fine imposed under subsection (5) of this section on the
condition that the person, within 120 days of the date of sentencing:




(A) Complete a motorcycle education course established by the department under ORS
802.320; and



(B) Obtain a motorcycle endorsement issued under ORS 807.170.
(b) The court shall set a hearing date for 120 days from the date of sentencing. At the
hearing the court shall:



(A) If the person has successfully completed the requirements described in paragraph
(a)(A) and (B) of this subsection, dismiss the fine imposed under subsection (5) of this section;
or



(B) If the person has not successfully completed the requirements described in paragraph
(a)(A) and (B) of this subsection:



(i) Grant the person an extension based on good cause shown; or
(ii) Impose the fine under subsection (5) of this section.



Here’s the bill:



http://www.leg.state.or.us/09reg/measures/sb0100.dir/sb0124.en.html


I'm all for riders being properly endorsed. For one thing, endorsed riders are less represented statistically in accidents that unendorsed riders. Secondly, our program is funded solely by motorcyclists. TEAM OREGON was set up to be funded by student tuitions and a portion of new and renewal endorsements. Obviously, I think education is much more powerful than punitive measures. The good news is that the fine gets waived if the rider successfully becomes endorsed within 120 days of sentencing.



Here's the piece of legislation that will probably have the biggest impact on our program.





This is to inform you that Senate Bill (SB) 546A passed the House last night on a vote of 33 to 25 and awaits the Governor’s signature to become law. If signed (which is expected), SB546 amends ORS 807.175 to require that all beginning (unendorsed) riders successfully complete a motorcycle rider training course before becoming eligible for a motorcycle endorsement. As you know, the law today requires course attendance for all new riders under the age of 21. Effective January 1, 2011, that age will raise to under 31 and continue to phase-in, as shown below:


(1) On or after January 1, 2011, to persons who are under 31
years of age as of that date.


(2) On or after January 1, 2012, to persons who are under 41
years of age as of that date.


(3) On or after January 1, 2013, to persons who are under 51
years of age as of that date.


(4) On or after January 1, 2014, to persons who are under 61
years of age as of that date.


(5) On or after January 1, 2015, to all persons. + }


Here’s a copy of the bill:

http://www.leg.state.or.us/09reg/measures/sb0500.dir/sb0546.a.html


The graduated implementation schedule is necesary for us to be able to ramp up. Interestingly, it won't be quite as much of a stretch as it might look. For example, last year we trained almost 10,000 students in all our classes. There were 12,000 new endorsements in the state. We weren't too far away. Who knows if the continued climb in new riders will continue? Time will tell.



That's all I'm going to offer for editorials. I'll leave the rest to you all should you wish!



Miles and smiles,



Dan

6 comments:

Arizona Harley Dude said...

It isn't unreasonable to require a rider training course to get an endorsement, but adding another part to the law should be made. Whenever a motorist is involved in an accident with a motorcycle and gets a ticket, that driver should have to attend the classroom portion of the training. It would lessen the claims of, "I didn't see him/her."

bobskoot said...



Mr Irondad:

I view this as "sort of" a good thing but unless Car Drivers have to take compulsory training then I don't think that you should be able to single out specific segments. The cause of most MC vs Car accidents are the left turning cager. Also I think that MC licensing should be progressive, such as they have in the UK. You get graduated engine/HP limits to prove your skill over years. Up here in BC, you are able to get your learner's permit, then go out and buy a Hayabusa, or CBR-1000RR.

So many 49'ers give us legitimate riders bad names as they lanesplit, cut off traffic , pass on the shoulder, etc. I think these are the ones to target.

bob
bobskoot: wet coast scootin

kz1000st said...

"You get graduated engine/HP limits to prove your skill over years. Up here in BC, you are able to get your learner's permit, then go out and buy a Hayabusa, or CBR-1000RR."

Now there's a piece of logic too obvious to miss, except for one thing. A 600cc Ninja bike is capable of 140+ mph. According to Cycle World a 250 Ninja can do 100 mph. Does the government then put speed goverors on bikes? Civil libertarians will scream at that one. In the quest for performance companies have painted themselves into a corner. Too many bikes are capable of too much speed for not much money from not much displacement. We won't go into all the goodies available from the aftermarket that can get you even more speed.
I could pass Dan's course now and leap right on to a ZX14 and go 185mph-looney.

Steve Williams said...

As potentially dangerous as motor vehicles (motorcycles, cars, and trucks) are to everyone on the road I am supportive of any measures to improve performance.

I also feel that all common sense tends to be put on a shelf when it comes to our personal transportation. That includes everyone (generally speaking) from manufacturers to drivers and riders and highway designers, etc.

It's like there is a collective insanity around these things. I've often wondered why there are cars that will go 150mph (or motorcycles), or why fines for speeding are so low if they want to control speed on the roads.

I suppose the road is where I get frustrated with the world. Others find it in politics or taxes or Iraq or whatever. For me it's things related to driving.

Glad to see Oregon taking steps to make riders responsible and experienced. At this rate before long you will be able to be a full-time instructor!

Steve Williams
Scooter in the Sticks

cpa3485 said...

I am guessing that your group lobbied heavily for this legislation. Seems like lobbyists can always buy what they want anymore. I am just kidding about your group though. In Kansas the laws are much less strict and I wish it wasn't so.

Dean W said...

Bobskoot- You might be surprised; I suspect a lot more car/moto accidents are the rider's fault than you think, failures in both judgement and skill.